RESEARCH ARTICLE


Experimental and Modeling Study of Galactosyl-Oligosaccharides Formation in Continuous Recycle Membrane Reactors (CRMR)



Roberto Gonzalez1, Mehrdad Ebrahimi2, Peter Czermak*, 2, 3
1 Polytechnic University of Nicaragua (UPOLI), Biotechnology Center (CEBiot), Costado Sur Villa Rubén Darío, Managua, Nicaragua
2 University of Applied Sciences Giessen-Friedberg, Institute of Biopharmaceutical Technology (IBPT), Wiesenstrasse 14, D-35390 Giessen, Germany
3 Kansas State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 105 Durland Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA


Article Metrics

CrossRef Citations:
0
Total Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 189
Abstract HTML Views: 655
PDF Downloads: 197
Total Views/Downloads: 1041
Unique Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 152
Abstract HTML Views: 479
PDF Downloads: 143
Total Views/Downloads: 774



© 2009 Gonzalez et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the University of Applied Sciences Giessen-Friedberg, Institute of Biopharmaceutical Technology (IBPT), Wiesenstrasse 14, D-35390 Giessen, Germany; E-mail: peter.czermak@tg.fh-giessen.de


Abstract

Galactosyl-oligosaccharides (GOS) can be produced with native enzymes in Continuous Recycle Membrane Reactors (CRMR) or with immobilized enzymes in Plug Flow Bed Reactors (PFBR). In this paper a simple three kinetic constants model was implemented and used to define the optimal operation conditions to obtain a higher GOS yield. Experimental GOS yield and productivity obtained with CRMR were in good agreement with simulated results. The advantages of using single CRMR, two coupled CRMR and single CRMR coupled with Simulated Moving Bed Chromatography (SMBC), for product separation and continuous lactose recycling, were investigated with a modeling and experimental study. Experimental studies for single CRMR showed a 89 % higher amount of produced GOS than reports from immobilized enzymes in Plug Flow Bed Reactors (PFBR). Two coupled CRMR produced a 25 % higher amount of GOS than single CRMR. Simulated results with CRMR and SMBC for continuous lactose recycling showed 45% higher GOS amount than single CRMR. The results prove the feasibility and advantages of GOS production in single or series CRMR with native enzymes with or without lactose recycling.