RESEARCH ARTICLE


Extending Rule Developing Experimentation to Perception of Food Packages with Eye Tracking



Alex Gofman*, 1, Howard R. Moskowitz2, Johanna Fyrbjork3, David Moskowitz4, Tõnis Mets5
1 Moskowitz Jacobs Inc., 1025 Westchester Ave., White Plains, New York 10604, USA
2 Moskowitz Jacobs Inc., 1025 Westchester Ave., White Plains, New York 10604, USA
3 Market Research Products, Tobii Technology AB, Karlsrovägen 2D, S-182 53 Danderyd, Sweden
4 Moskowitz Jacobs Inc., 1025 Westchester Ave., White Plains, New York 10604, USA
5 Centre for Entrepreneurship, University of Tartu, Narva Rd 4 - B104, Tartu EE51009, Estonia


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© 2009 Gofman et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Moskowitz Jacobs Inc., 1025 Westchester Ave., White Plains, New York 10604, USA; Tel: 914-421-7400; Fax: 914-428-8364; E-mail: articles@alexgofman.com


Abstract

The paper presents an approach to analyzing food packages based on the eye-tracking analysis of consumers exposed to experimentally designed prototypes of packages based on Rule Developing Experimentation methodology. In addition, the paper analyses emotional reactions to conceptual packages (the respondent had a choice among seven alternatives, including one ‘non-emotion’ response). The combined approach allows the researcher and the designer to control the stimuli, presenting known combinations to the respondent leading to the discovery of existing links between what the researcher can do to the stimulus by means of a systematic design, how the eye tracks these changes, and what type of response the participant in a study might make (e.g., interest, statement of emotion). The paper explores this new interlinked approach working with a popular product, wine in a box.