RESEARCH ARTICLE


Characterization of ‘Honeycrisp’ and ‘McIntosh’ Apple Juice Quality in Relation to Delayed Cooling Treatments



Jingfei Gao, H. P. Vasantha Rupasinghe*
Department of Environmental Sciences, Nova Scotia Agri-cultural College, PO Box 550, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada B2N 5E3.


© 2012 Gao and Rupasinghe;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Tree Fruit Bio-product Re-search Program, Department of Environmental Sciences, Nova Scotia Agri-cultural College, PO Box 550, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada B2N 5E3; Tel: +19028936623; Fax: +19028931404; E-mail: vrupasinghe@nsac.ca


Abstract

In order to examine the influence of delayed cooling on juice quality, seven and three days of delayed cooling were applied to ‘Honeycrisp’ and ‘McIntosh’ apples, respectively. After the delayed cooling treatment, apples were stored in refrigerated air (RA) and in three different controlled atmospheres (CA) for six months. Titratable acidity (TA) de-creased over the storage period due to the delayed cooling treatment for both ‘Honeycrisp’ and ‘McIntosh’ apples. Lower TA was detected in RA-stored apples compared to CA-stored fruit. In addition, the lowest TA of the juice samples was detected when ‘McIntosh’ apples were stored in RA with no delayed cooling treatment.

Keywords: Apple, delayed cooling, storage, low-acid juice, postharvest.