Effect of Potassium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate Combination to Inhibit Listeria Monocytogenes In Low and High Fat Chicken and Turkey Hotdog Model Systems



A. V. S. Perumalla1, Navam. S. Hettiarachchy*, 1, 2, Kenneth. F. Over3, Steven. C. Ricke1, 2, Edward. E. Gbur 4, Jinying Zhang 4, Brad Davis3
1 Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72704, USA
2 Center for Food Safety, Dept. of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72704, USA
3 Tyson Foods Inc., Springdale, AR 72764, USA
4 Agricultural Statistics Laboratory, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA


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© 2012 Perumalla et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Food Science & Institute of Food Science and Engineering, 2650 N. Young Ave, Dept. of Food Science, Fayetteville, AR, 72704, USA; Tel: (479) 575-4779; Fax: (479) 575-6936; E-mail: nhettiar@uark.edu


Abstract

Effect of potassium lactate (PL) and sodium diacetate (SD) combinations at varying levels were evaluated in low (5%) and high (20%) fat chicken and turkey hotdog model systems. All the samples were surface inoculated with Lis-teria monocytogenes (approximately 4.6 log cfu/g), vacuum packed and stored at 4 °C for 28 days to determine the effec-tive combination of PL and SD and the effect of fat content on the growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes. In chicken hot-dog samples, maximum growth inhibitions (3.4 log cfu/g) were observed in low fat samples formulated with 3.0% PL and 0.15% SD. In turkey hotdog samples, maximum growth inhibitions (3.3 log cfu/g) were observed in low fat samples for-mulated with 3.0% PL and 0.2% SD. Effective combination levels determined in low and high fat chicken were 3.0% PL and 0.15% SD, whereas in low and high fat turkey, the effective levels were 3.0% PL and 0.20% SD. Overall, fat content had significant effect (P < 0.05) on growth inhibition as indicated by higher inhibitions in low fat chicken and turkey hot-dogs than high fat samples. These results demonstrate that commercial usage levels of PL (2.0%) and SD (0.15%) alone are not sufficient to control L. monocytogenes in case of pathogen contamination.

Keywords: Fat content, Hotdogs, Listeria monocytogenes, Potassium Lactate, Sodium Diacetate.