RESEARCH ARTICLE


Effect of Potassium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate Combination to Inhibit Listeria Monocytogenes In Low and High Fat Chicken and Turkey Hotdog Model Systems



A. V. S. Perumalla1, Navam. S. Hettiarachchy*, 1, 2, Kenneth. F. Over3, Steven. C. Ricke1, 2, Edward. E. Gbur 4, Jinying Zhang 4, Brad Davis3
1 Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72704, USA
2 Center for Food Safety, Dept. of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72704, USA
3 Tyson Foods Inc., Springdale, AR 72764, USA
4 Agricultural Statistics Laboratory, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA


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© 2012 Perumalla et al.;

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Food Science & Institute of Food Science and Engineering, 2650 N. Young Ave, Dept. of Food Science, Fayetteville, AR, 72704, USA; Tel: (479) 575-4779; Fax: (479) 575-6936; E-mail: nhettiar@uark.edu


Abstract

Effect of potassium lactate (PL) and sodium diacetate (SD) combinations at varying levels were evaluated in low (5%) and high (20%) fat chicken and turkey hotdog model systems. All the samples were surface inoculated with Lis-teria monocytogenes (approximately 4.6 log cfu/g), vacuum packed and stored at 4 °C for 28 days to determine the effec-tive combination of PL and SD and the effect of fat content on the growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes. In chicken hot-dog samples, maximum growth inhibitions (3.4 log cfu/g) were observed in low fat samples formulated with 3.0% PL and 0.15% SD. In turkey hotdog samples, maximum growth inhibitions (3.3 log cfu/g) were observed in low fat samples for-mulated with 3.0% PL and 0.2% SD. Effective combination levels determined in low and high fat chicken were 3.0% PL and 0.15% SD, whereas in low and high fat turkey, the effective levels were 3.0% PL and 0.20% SD. Overall, fat content had significant effect (P < 0.05) on growth inhibition as indicated by higher inhibitions in low fat chicken and turkey hot-dogs than high fat samples. These results demonstrate that commercial usage levels of PL (2.0%) and SD (0.15%) alone are not sufficient to control L. monocytogenes in case of pathogen contamination.

Keywords: Fat content, Hotdogs, Listeria monocytogenes, Potassium Lactate, Sodium Diacetate.